Revelation Perth International Film Festival – Part 2

If we could bend time and space by driving around in a DeLorean, then we would go back and see everything that Revelation has to offer! But sadly, as we can’t be in multiple places at once, we can only bring you a couple more of the freaky and fantastical films screening around Perth. It all wraps up this weekend, so get in before it’s all over, red rover!

Der Bunker

Nikias Chryssos invites us into his madhouse, which is little more than a bunker in the German woods, filled with his nightmares.

⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ½
Zachary Cruz-Tan

07 July - Revelation FF Der Bunker

I am fairly certain – no, I am certain that this is the first movie I’ve seen in which two grown men breastfeed from a woman who claims to have an evil alien living inside her leg. You can’t make this stuff up. The alien speaks to the woman (Oona von Maydell) like The Exorcist‘s Regan MacNeil through a vocoder and instructs that her son, Klaus (Daniel Fripan), be taught the ways of manhood. Meanwhile, her husband (David Scheller) sports a lively moustache, and their guest, a visiting student (Pit Bukowski), has to watch as his three maniacal hosts turn their home into the devil’s playground.

Der Bunker, directed by first-timer Nikias Chryssos, is an absurd extrapolation of a very serious topic. Parents want the best for their kids. But what happens when they want their German son to become president of the United States? Is that something Klaus can achieve in his lifetime, or in any German’s lifetime? Do they not see that he’s an eight-year-old boy who looks thirty-five, and that the alien leg of his mother will probably follow him to America and become its own reality TV show? These questions whizzed through my mind as I sat through Der Bunker, but I realise they shouldn’t be asked, because this is a movie that is completely unhinged from notions of reality. It exists purely within the inexplicable confines of the titular bunker, and in such a place, rules are boundless.

But movies need rules, don’t they? We need rules, or else we lose track of vision. Even The Lobster (2015), which ran away with its crazy ideas about love and the future, established for itself rules to live by, and it worked. Der Bunker is too wild for its own good. It lacks control, and has an ending that’s too tame for the abstract madness it introduces in the first two acts. I won’t spoil anything, but I wanted more madness. I wanted to be taken apart and put back together wrongly, so that nothing truly made sense anymore.

Der Bunker screens at Cinema Paradiso Sunday 17 July


Patrick’s Day

Perhaps Patrick’s Day has something challenging to say about mental illness – shame it’s an unpleasant experience you’ll want to put out of your mind immediately afterwards.

⭐ ⭐
Corey Hogan

07 July - Revelation FF Patricks Day

On his twenty-sixth birthday, which happens to fall on St. Patrick’s Day, a schizophrenic young man named Patrick (Moe Dunford) escapes the clutches of his overbearing and obsessive mother Maura (Kerry Fox) during a festival in Dublin. Patrick crosses paths with Karen (Catherine Walker), a suicidal air-hostess, who – on her last planned night of being alive – invites Patrick up to her hotel room to take his virginity. Patrick falls in love, and Karen begins to reconsider her decision, until Maura conspires with an eccentric local cop (Philip Jackson) to convince Patrick that Karen was simply a figment of his deluded mind.

It’s easy to see what writer/director Terry McMahon (Charlie Casanova) thinks he has created; a fresh, unflinching honest portrayal of mental illness that evades the usual trappings associated with the genre. There are hints of these at times, but in reality Patrick’s Day is a mostly hackneyed and unremarkable disability drama. A potentially ripe and well-intentioned idea drowned in its unconvincing execution, McMahon’s film has an unshakable sense poignancy that is often tempting to believe, but there are just too many rough edges and disharmonic parts to create a valuable whole.

The film’s most alienating aspect is its colossal and frequent shifts in mood and tone, which come across (perhaps intentionally, but ineffectively) as schizophrenic in themselves. Matching this is an equally inconsistent soundtrack, skipping from raucously loud Irish shanties to an obnoxiously pounding score.

The cast at least do their best with the wholly unlikable characters they’re given, especially Dunford, who remains believable even as McMahon is increasingly cruel and borderline distasteful to his lead. The cynicism and contempt really sets in when Patrick’s Day crescendos in a harrowing electro-shock sequence copied and pasted directly from Requiem for a Dream, then does a complete 180 degree turn in favour of an outlandishly optimistic outcome. If you don’t feel cheated, you’ll at least be disoriented enough to wonder if you’ve contracted schizophrenia yourself.

Patrick’s Day screens at Luna On SX on Saturday July 16


Images courtesy of Revelation Perth International Film Festival 

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